RMI aims to build 600-acre industrial park next to Colorado Air and Space Port

Rocky Mountain Industrials has proposed a 600-acre industrial park in Adams County, next to the Colorado Air and Space Port. Image provided to the Denver Post by Rocky Mountain Industrials.

Rocky Mountain Industrials has proposed a 600-acre industrial park in Adams County, next to the Colorado Air and Space Port. Image provided to the Denver Post by Rocky Mountain Industrials.

Rocky Mountain Industrials would use park to distribute limestone from Glenwood Springs quarry, the expansion of which is opposed by officials and residents in the Western Slope community

The Denver Post
July 6, 2020

By Judith Kohler | jkohler@denverpost.com

A 600-acre site next to the Colorado Air and Space Port in Adams County could become a kind of inland port for businesses manufacturing and distributing goods and could generate hundreds of jobs under a plan by Rocky Mountain Industrials.

The company has proposed building an industrial park at the site about a mile north of Interstate 70 and adjacent to the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Adams County has given preliminary approval to Rocky Mountain Industrials’ development plans. The final review is underway.

There is a need for ways to distribute goods and materials like the sand, gravel and other materials that Rocky Mountain Industrials produces and provides, said Greg Dangler, CEO and co-founder of the Denver company.

One of the company’s products is limestone, which it mines from a quarry it owns just north of Glenwood Springs. Its plan to expand  the Mid-Continent quarry to nearly 450 acres from about 16 acres has stirred strong opposition in the area.

Rocky Mountain Industrials would ship the limestone from Glenwood Springs to the industrial park, which Dangler called “essentially an inland port.”

“We need distribution capabilities for the supply chain and it just didn’t exist,” he said.

The park will provide a combination of different kinds of transportation and industrial zoning.

“Think about it as an industrial subdivision. We are the anchor tenant. We’ll use it to distribute high-value materials via train,” Dangler said. “We’ll bring mined product to the area and distribute it throughout the Front Range.”

Read the entire article on the Denver Post website

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